Roseville Pottery Patterns

Apple Blossom was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1949 and stayed in production until 1952.  The Apple Blossom pattern displays flowering, white apple blossoms with brown branches winding through the flowers and forming the handles.  Blue, green, and pink are the three standard factory colors for the Apple Blossom pattern.

Roseville Apple Blossom Vase

Apple Blossom is marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark and shape number, and size.  Roseville pottery advertisements indicate the pattern includes 45 shapes, but only 41 appear in the factory brochure.  The pattern includes baskets, bookends, bowls, candle holders, cornucopias, ewers, flower pot and saucer, hanging baskets, jardinières, planters, tea set, vases, wall pocket, and a window box. 

There are Roseville pottery collectors actively seeking all three colors of Apple Blossom.  The pattern is moderately priced.

Artcraft is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1933.  Many Artcraft shapes are art deco or modernistic some with arts and crafts glazes. Standard colors for Artcraft include mottled matte blue/green, tan arts and crafts glazes or glossy solid color art deco glazes. 

Roseville Artcraft

Artcraft was originally marked with foil Roseville Pottery labels.  Some examples have hand-written shape numbers.  The number of shapes and glazes used in the Artcraft has not been fully documented.  The Artcraft pattern is very popular with both arts and crafts and art deco, modernism collectors with rare shapes and glazes bring premium prices.  

Artwood is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1951.  Standard colors include green, gray and yellow.  The shapes are Mid-Century Modern, Art Deco style.  The pattern includes only 13 different shapes.  Shapes include various planters and vases. 

Roseville Artwood Vase

Artwood is marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark and shape number.  Artwood is one of the more affordable patterns, however in recent years prices have been increasing particularly for harder to find shapes.

Aztec is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1905.  Standard colors include blue, gray and tan.  The pattern style is Arts and Crafts or Art Nouveau.  The shapes for the Roseville Aztec pattern included primarily vases and pitchers. 

Roseville Aztec Vase

Aztec was usually unmarked.  Some examples have been found with the Rozane wafer mark.  The Aztec pattern is scarce and sought after by pottery collectors.  Minor damage and repair is sometimes overlooked due to the rarity of the pattern.

Azurean is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1903.  Other factory names for this pattern include Rozane Azurean.  The Azurean pattern is decorated with underglaze slip decoration in shades of blue and gray.  Designs often include floral sprays and scenic landscapes.  Roseville Azurean was typically marked Azurean, RPCo and the shape number.  Many examples of Azurean are also artist initialed or signed. 

Roseville Azurean Vase

The Azurean pattern was introduced as a response to Rookwood Pottery’s popular Aerial Blue and Weller’s Blue Louwelsa patterns.  Shapes include various vases, pitchers, teapots, and tankards.  

Baneda is a popular middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1932.  Standard colors include green and pink.  The green examples are highly sought after by Arts and Crafts collectors, while the pink pieces are desired by Art Deco buyers.  Baneda was marked with either paper or foil labels. 

Roseville Pottery Baneda VaseThe factory stock pages show 36 shapes for the Baneda pattern, including bowls, candle holders, jardinières, vases, and a wall pocket.  This pattern of Roseville pottery is highly sought after by today’s collectors and prices remain strong. 

Bittersweet is a late line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1951.  Standard colors are green, grey, and yellow.  The shapes resemble Mid-Century Modern, but with more symmetry and subdued colors.  Factory stock pages show 42 shapes.  The pattern includes baskets, jardinières, vases, bookends, planters, bowls, window boxes, a wall pocket, and a tea set. 

 Roseville Pottery Bittersweet Vase

Bittersweet is marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark, shape number, and size.  This pattern is gaining popularity with Roseville pottery collectors and as a result prices are increasing. 

Blackberry is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1932.  The pattern features bluish-black berries on green vines with yellow, orange, and green leaves on an irregularly molded green and brown background.  Blackberry was originally marked with foil labels.  Some examples have hand written shape numbers. 

Roseville Pottery Blackberry Vase

Factory stock pages show 29 designs.  Shapes include bowls, baskets, vases, jardinières, hanging baskets, candlesticks, and wall pockets.  The Roseville Blackberry pattern has been a long time favorite among pottery collectors and that is reflected by the prices paid for the pattern. 

Bleeding Heart is a late period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1940.  Standard colors include green, pink, and blue.  The shapes have a realistic style with Art Deco features.  The pattern features 48 different shapes, including vases, jardinières, pedestals, bookends, cornucopias, baskets, bowls, ewers, candlesticks, wall pockets, trays, pitchers, and flower pots.

Roseville Pottery Bleeding Heart VaseBleeding Heart is marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.  While there is collector interest in all three colors of Bleeding Heart, blue is valued highest among many pottery collectors.  

Bushberry is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1941.  Bushberry appeals to Mid-Century Modern lovers.  Standard colors are blue, green, and orange.  Bushberry pottery advertisements indicated the pattern included 64 shapes, but only 61 appear in the factory stock pages.  The pattern includes vases, jardinières, pedestals, mugs, ewers, compotes, tea service pieces, bookends, ashtrays, wall pockets, and cornucopias.  

Roseville Pottery Bushberry Vase

Bushberry is marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.  Values for Roseville Bushberry have steadily increased in recent years. 

Capri is a popular late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1953.¬† It remains one of the most affordable Roseville lines today although prices have begun to rise as collectors seek out examples of this art deco pattern.¬† Standard colors include green, red, and yellow.¬† The factory brochure described the 31 shapes in the line as ‚Äúodd,‚ÄĚ rather than round or oblong.¬† The pattern includes baskets, bowls, ashtrays, jardini√®res, cornucopia, and planters.¬† Capri was marked with the raised Roseville script, shape number, and size.

Roseville Pottery Capri Vase

In 1954 Roseville introduced Late Capri.  Standard colors include black, blue, pink, and white.  The pattern style is Mid-Century Modern.  Late Capri was also marked with the raised Roseville script, shape number, and size.

Carnelian was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1926.  Original Carnelian (Carnelian I) drip pieces are bluish green over turquoise or yellowish tan over light tan.  Later drip pieces are dark blue over pink or dark blue over light blue.  When the line didn’t sell well, the unsold pieces were reglazed with mottled colors, including rose, purple, lavender, tan, peach, green, or blue.  This later line is referred to by Roseville collectors as Carnelian II (Carnelian Glazes).

Roseville Pottery Carnelian Vase

Factory stock pages show 103 shapes, including various vases, flower blocks, flower holders, bowls, candlesticks, wall pockets, and ewers.  Carnelian I and II (Drip and Glazes) pieces are either unmarked or stamped with a blue Rv mark.  

Cherry Blossom is a middle period Art Deco pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1933.  Standard colors include tan with white or green with pink.  Most collectors prefer the pink variety.  The 25 Cherry Blossom shapes include bowls, baskets, vases, jardinières, pedestals, candlesticks, and wall pockets.

Roseville Pottery Cherry Blossom Vase

Cherry Blossom was originally marked with foil labels.  Some examples have hand written shape numbers. 

Chloron is an early period Art Nouveau line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1905.  The standard color is matte green.  The decorations, mostly floral, are only slightly raised.  The pattern includes only 19 different shapes, including vases, bowls, ewers, and candlesticks.  Many of these shapes were later used by Roseville in the Egypto and Mara patterns.

Roseville Pottery Chloron Vase

Chloron can sometimes be found marked with a distinctive ‚ÄúChloron‚ÄĚ inkstamp.¬† The line resembles the designs of a later pattern called Egypto, so unmarked pieces may be mistaken for Egypto.

Clemana is a middle period, art deco pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1936.  The name is sometimes spelled Clemena.  Clemana is fairly rare today, and it is typical to find examples of this pattern with damage.  The factory stock pages show 18 shapes, including vases, bowls, and candlesticks.

Roseville Pottery Clemana Vase

Roseville Clemana was originally marked with foil labels.  Some examples have hand written shape numbers. Pieces made after 1936 have die-impressed marks, including the Roseville script, shape number, and size. 

Clematis is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1944.  Standard colors are brown, blue, or green.  For many Roseville collectors, the green and brown examples are slightly more preferable than the blue.  The factory stock pages show 47 shapes, including vases, jardinières, pedestals, ewers, cookie jars, tea service pieces, bookends, wall pockets, and cornucopias.

Roseville Pottery Clematis Vase

Clematis is marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.  This pattern is finally starting to gain popularity with collectors.

Columbine was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1941.  Standard colors are blue, brown, and pink. Pieces are marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark, shape number, and size.

Roseville Pottery Columbine Vase

Roseville pottery advertisements indicated the Columbine pattern included 46 shapes but only 44 appear in the factory brochure.  The pattern includes baskets, bookends, bowls, cornucopias, jardinières, pedestals, vases, candlesticks, etc.

Corinthian is a middle period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1923.  Corinthian shapes have fluted bodies with green tinting in the grooves and a Renaissance border of brown, green, and purple at the mouth.  The line is somewhat similar to the Roseville Normandy pattern.

Roseville Pottery Corinthian Vase

The Corinthian pattern includes 41 different shapes, including vases flower blocks, compotes, planters, baskets, jardinières, pedestals, wall pockets, flower pots, and candlesticks.  Pieces are either unmarked or stamped with a blue Rv logo. 

Cosmos is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1939.  Standard colors are blue, brown, and green.  The blue tends to be the most popular today.  Although advertisements mention 48 shapes, only 45 appear in factory stock pages.  Shapes include baskets, bookends, bowls, cornucopias, jardinières, pedestals, vases, candlesticks, etc.

Roseville Pottery Cosmos Vase

Roseville Cosmos was typically marked with die-impressed marks, including the Roseville script, shape number, and size.

Roseville Creamware was originally introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1910.  The various factory names used for Roseville’s Creamware patterns include Coat of Arms, Decorated Trace, Dutch, Eagle, Elk, Forget Me Not, Gibson Girls, Gold Trace, Holly, Indian, Jeanette, Juvenile, Knights of Pythias, Medallion, Moose, Novelties, Nursery Line, Orange or Blue Bands, Persian and Tourist. 

Roseville Pottery Creamware VaseThe Roseville Creamware patterns were often unmarked but some examples are marked with the ‚ÄúRoseville Pottery‚ÄĚ ink stamp.¬† Later examples from around 1924 of Roseville Creamware are marked with Rv ink stamp.

Cremo is an early Art Nouveau line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1905.  Cremo’s tube-line decoration features green, curved lines with blue and yellow flowers on a background that blends from pink to yellow to green.  Cremo is popular with collectors, who will often overlook damage just to add a piece to their collections. 

Roseville Pottery Cremo Vase

Cremo is typically unmarked.  There are 11 vases and one jardinière listed on the factory stock page.  Many of the shapes used for the Cremo pattern come from the Roseville Rozane line.

Cremona is a middle period Art Deco pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1928.  Standard colors included green and pink.  Cremona was originally marked with foil labels.  The shapes are mostly symmetrical and somewhat dainty.  These 20 shapes include vases, bowls, flower frogs, and candlesticks.   Cremona’s value tends to be moderate today.   

Roseville Pottery Cremona Vase

Crocus is an early period Arts and Crafts line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1905.  This line may have been called Egyptian, and collectors sometimes call it Conventional Landscape or Shiny Aztec.  Designs tend to be a floral motif on a background of either a different shade or a contrasting color.  This slip decorated line shares many of its shapes with Aztec, another early Arts and Crafts line. 

There are no known factory stock pages for Crocus and, therefore, no record of how many shapes there are. Crocus is usually unmarked, but may have a die-impressed number, slip-painted artist’s initials, or the Rozane Ware wafer.

Crystal Green is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1939.  The standard color is a mottled light green.  Its shapes often have pleated rims like the Cosmos line, and they may have been introduced as an addition to the Ivory line.  Shapes include vases, ewers, bowls, wall shelves, and baskets.

 Roseville Pottery Crystal Green Vase

Crystal Green is marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark and shape number.  This line resembles green Velmoss in style and typical pricing.  The Crystal Green pattern is relatively scarce.

Crystalis is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1906.  Standard colors include blue, green, orange, and red.  The patterns style is Arts and Crafts.  The 14 shapes for the Roseville Crystalis pattern include primarily vases and ewers. 

Crystalis is usually unmarked.  Some examples have a Rozane Ware paper logo,  a Rozane wafer mark, or a Mongol wafer.  Demand is high for this line, and collectors are willing to pay premium prices.

Dahlrose is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1928.  Dahlrose is decorated with a daisy-type, yellow flower with green leaves on a textured, greenish brown wash.  Factory stock pages show 26 shapes, including bowls, vases, baskets, window boxes, jardinières, pedestals, candlesticks, and wall pockets.  Roseville Dahlrose was typically marked with paper labels, leaving many pieces unmarked today.

Roseville Pottery Dahlrose

Dawn is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1937.   The shapes are Art Deco, and standard colors include yellow, green, and pink.  Dawn pieces tend to have round bodies with angular handles, and they are decorated with a leaf design that is hand-tinted in either green or white.  It is rather rare to find examples of Roseville Dawn without minor chips to the edges of the base.

Roseville Pottery Dawn Vase

The factory stock pages show 18 shapes for the Dawn pattern, including bowls, candlesticks, vases, and ewers.  Dawn was marked with die-impressed marks, including the Roseville script, shape number, and size. 

Della Robbia is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1906.  The patterns style is Arts and Crafts with influences from ancient cultures.  Della Robbia pieces are decorated with a variety of color combinations.  There were 3 teapots and 18 vases in the factory stock pages, and an additional 83 designs appear in the 1906 Rozane Ware catalog.

Roseville Pottery Della Robbia Vase

Della Robbia was usually unmarked, but some examples have been found with the Rozane wafer mark.   Many pieces bear the artists’ signatures or initials.  Della Robbia is arguably the most valuable Roseville pattern today.  It is highly sought after and prized by collectors, with the more colorful pieces bringing the highest demand and premium prices. 

Dogwood (Smooth) also known as Dogwood II is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery by 1920.  The pattern features flowering dogwood branches in black and ivory against a smooth, dark green background.  Roseville Dogwood (smooth) was typically unmarked, but some examples have the shape number and size stamped in blue ink.  There were only 13 shapes shown in the factory stock pages but more are known to exist. Shapes include vases, jardinières, pedestals, and an umbrella stand. 

Roseville Pottery Dogwood (Smooth) Vase

Dogwood (Textured) also known as Dogwood I is a middle period pattern that came about when Roseville altered its popular Dogwood (Smooth) pattern in 1926.   Dogwood (Textured) was usually stamped with a blue Rv, but some pieces are either unmarked or have a mark that is obscured by thick glaze.  The factory stock pages show 22 Dogwood (Textured) shapes, including bowls, baskets, jardinières, pedestals, vases, an umbrella stand, and a wall pocket. 

Roseville Pottery Dogwood (Textured) Vase

Donatello was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1916.  Standard colors are green and white.  Examples in gray are rare.  There were 91 shapes in the factory stock pages and an additional 18 in the July 1916 price list. Shapes include vases, bowls, ashtrays, dishes, baskets, jardinières, candlesticks, and hanging baskets. 

 Roseville Pottery Donatello Vase

Early Donatello pieces were unmarked, but a few have a raised Donatello mark or a blue inkstamp of the shape number and size.  Clean examples of Roseville Donatello with limited crazing are highly sought-after by collectors and bring premium prices. 

Earlam is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1930.  Standard colors included mottled matte green/tan or tan/purple.  Earlam has both an Arts and Crafts design and an Early American appearance, making it appealing to a wide variety of collectors.  There are 23 shapes, including strawberry jars, vases, bowls, flower blocks, baskets, candlesticks, and wall pockets.  Earlam was originally marked with paper labels, and some examples have a hand-written shape number. 

Roseville Pottery Earlam Vase

Early Carnelian, also known as Roseville Blended, is an early period Arts and Crafts line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1916.  Standard colors include mottled green, blue, pink, or purple.  The matte green glaze is somewhat similar to the Roseville Antique Matte Green glaze.

Roseville Pottery Early Carnelian VaseEarly Carnelian is typically unmarked, but some examples have a hand-incised shape number.  The factory stock page shows 28 shapes, and an additional 85 are mentioned in the July 1916 price list, including vases, bowls, flower holders, centerpieces, jardinières, and candlesticks.

Early Velmoss is a popular early period Roseville Pottery pattern introduced by 1916.  The pattern features a mottled green, either and brown glaze that was first used in the Early Carnelian line.  The shapes are Arts and Crafts or Art Nouveau.  A 1916 price list shows 31 shape numbers for bowls, vases, jardinières, pedestals, and umbrella stands.  Early Velmoss is unmarked, but some examples have a hand-written shape number and size.

Roseville Pottery Early Velmoss Vase

Egypto (Rozane Egypto) is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1905.  The standard color is matte green, and at least 7 of the shapes are borrowed from Chloron.  There is no documentation for the exact number of Egypto shapes, but there are 39 known shapes.  The 1905 and 1906 catalogs show vases fern dishes, ewers, pitchers, oil lamps, and baskets. 

Roseville Pottery Egypto Vase

Egypto was marked with Egypto wafers, and pieces that do not have a wafer are most likely Early Matt Green.  Arts and Crafts collectors avidly seek Egypto shapes. 

Falline is a middle period Art Deco line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1933.  Standard colors are blue and brown.  Blue Falline is most popular with Roseville collectors.  Falline was marked with foil labels, and some have hand-written shape numbers.  Factory stock pages show 16 items.  The pattern includes bowls, vases, and candlesticks. 

 Roseville Pottery Falline Vase

Ferella is a middle period Art Deco pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1930.  The pattern was named after art director Frank Ferrell.  Standard colors included brown and raspberry red.  The factory stock page shows 24 shapes, including flower blocks, bowls, vases, flower pots, candlesticks, and wall pockets.

Roseville Pottery Ferella Vase

Ferella was originally marked with paper labels.  Some examples have hand written shape numbers.  Ferella is considered scarce and is highly sought after by Art Deco collectors.  Alternate spellings for the pattern include Ferrella.

Florane is a late period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1949.  Standard colors include green, gray and blue.  The shapes are Mid-Century Modern.  The pattern has 24 different shapes, including vases, jardinières, bowls, planters, and window boxes.

Roseville Pottery Florane Vase

Florane is marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.  Collector nicknames for the pattern include Commercial, Nova and Florane II.  Interest and prices for this Roseville pattern have begun to increase. 

Florentine is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1924.  Standard colors are brown and ivory.  Most collectors refer to the brown examples as Florentine I and the cream examples as Florentine II.  Florentine II is believed to have been introduced by Roseville between 1933 and 1935.  The pattern style is Italianate. 

Roseville Pottery Florentine Vase

Although it was a popular Roseville pattern when it was new, its prices today are moderate.  The shapes for the Roseville Florentine pattern included bowls, vases, fern dishes, compotes, flower blocks, ashtrays, gates, jardinières, pedestals, umbrella stands, candlesticks, and wall pockets.  Florentine was either unmarked or stamped with a blue Rv logo.

Foxglove is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1942.  Standard colors are blue, green, and pink.  There are 53 different shapes, including vases, ewers, compotes, gates, cornucopias, baskets, trays, jardinières, pedestals, candlesticks, and wall pockets. 

Roseville Pottery Foxglove Vase

Roseville Foxglove was typically marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark, shape number, and size.  Although Foxglove is quite popular with collectors, its prices are still somewhat moderate. 

Freesia is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1945.  Standard colors include blue, brown, and green.  Green and blue Freesia are typically more sought after by Roseville collectors.  Although Roseville advertised that there were 48 Freesia shapes, the factory stock pages show only 47. There are several vases, bowls, candlesticks, jardinières, pedestals, cookie jar, tea service set, compote, window box, and wall pocket.  Freesia was marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark, shape number, and size. 

Roseville Pottery Freesia VaseFuchsia was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1938.  Standard colors are green, blue, and brown.  Fuchsia’s style is Realistic with Art Deco elements.  Fuchsia is marked with the die-impressed Roseville script mark, size, and shape number.  Roseville pottery advertisements indicated the pattern included 40 shapes but only 38 appear in the factory brochure.  The pattern includes baskets, bowls, cornucopias, jardinières, pedestals, vases, wall pocket, etc. 

Roseville Pottery Fuchsia Vase

Alternative spelling names for this popular Roseville pattern include Fushia, Fuschia, and Fuchsia.  Fuchia is marked with the die-impressed Roseville script mark, size, and shape number. 

Fudji is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1906.  This Art Nouveau line has distinct Japanese elements.  Its shapes feature blue or red enamel glazes painted over air-brushed backgrounds of tan, light blue, and gray.  Fudji was generally unmarked, but some pieces have been found with a Rozane Ware wafer.  There are 16 different Fudji vases in the 1906 Rozane Ware catalog. 

Roseville Pottery Fudji Vase

Futura is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1928.  The colors vary and there is a Futura piece in just about any color scheme.  Futura is Art Deco and is very popular with collectors.  Futura was marked with paper labels, and some examples have been hand-written shape numbers.

Roseville Pottery Futura Vase

The shapes for the Roseville Futura pattern were primarily vases, but there were a few others, like flower blocks, bowls, baskets, jardinières, pedestals, candlesticks, and wall pockets.  Over the years, Roseville collectors have developed nicknames for many of the 78 different patterns shown in the factory stock pages, including such popular pieces such as Michelin Man, Elephant Leg, Tank, and many more. 

Gardenia is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1950.  Standard colors include brown, green, and gray.  Gardenia was marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark, shape number, and size. 

Roseville Pottery Gardenia Vase

Although Roseville advertised 40 shapes, the factory stock pages show 39.  Gardenia shapes include vases, jardinières, pedestals, baskets, ewers, cornucopias, bowls, window boxes, wall pockets, bookends, and candlesticks.

Imperial I (Textured) is a middle period rustic pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1921.  Imperial I (Textured) has an irregularly modeled background with shades of green and brown.  The low-relief decoration is a vine with berries or grapes.  Imperial (Textured) was usually unmarked, but some examples have a blue inkstamp with the shape number and size.  There are 30 shapes, including bowls, vases, wall pockets, ferners, baskets, window boxes, jardinières, pedestals, and an umbrella stand.

Roseville Pottery Imperial I (Textured) Vase

Imperial II (Glazes) is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1930.  The pattern has both Art Deco and Arts and Crafts pattern.  There are several standard colors of glazes, both matte and semi-gloss.  There are 34 shapes, including bowls, vases, wall pockets, candlesticks, and an ashtray. 

Roseville Pottery Imperial II (Glazes) Vase

Imperial II (Glazes) was originally marked with paper labels.  Some examples have hand written shape numbers.  The pattern is highly sought-after by Roseville pottery collectors. 

Iris is a late period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1939.  Standard colors include blue, brown, and pink.  Blue is the most popular color in this collectible Roseville pattern.  The shapes are realistic with Art Deco features.  Although there were 45 shapes advertised, the factory stock pages show only 43.  Shapes include various bowls, vases, wall pockets, ewers, baskets, window boxes, jardinières, pedestals, cornucopias, etc. Iris is marked with the die-impressed Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.

Roseville Pottery Iris Vase

Ivory is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1932.    The standard color is matt ivory, and the pattern style is Classical or Art Deco.  Factory stock pages show 183 Ivory shapes.  New shapes were added periodically. Shapes were taken from patterns such as Volpato, Savona, Russco, Crystal Green, Orian, Donatello, Carnelian, Velmoss, Tourmaline, etc.  

Roseville Pottery Ivory Vase

Early Ivory pieces were marked with paper or foil labels, some with hand-written shape numbers.  Later examples, after 1935, have the die-impressed Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.

Ixia is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1937.  The standard colors are pink, green, and yellow.  The pattern style is Art Deco.  Roseville Ixia was marked with a die-impressed Roseville script mark and the shape number. Roseville advertised 40 shapes for Ixia, but factory stock pages show only 38.  Shapes include bowls, baskets, jardinières, pedestals, vases, candlesticks, and candelabras. 

Roseville Pottery Ixia Vase

Jonquil is a popular middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1930.  The standard decoration is a bark-like textured background with blossoms on stems in clusters of three. Jonquil was marked with either paper or foil labels.  The factory stock pages show 41 shapes for the Jonquil pattern, including vases, baskets, bowls, candlesticks, jardinières, and the strawberry jar.

Roseville Pottery Jonquil Vase

La Rose is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1924.  The standard decoration was an egg-shell body with raised garlands of green leaves and pink roses.  Factory stock pages show 35 different shapes, including bowls, vases, jardinières, pedestals, candlesticks, wall pockets, baskets, etc. 

La Rose was generally unmarked, but some examples are stamped with a blue Rv logo.  Alternative collector names for this pattern include La Rosa and LaRose. 

Laurel is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1934.  Green Laurel is very popular with Arts and Crafts collectors while red and yellow Laurel is sought-after by Art Deco enthusiasts.  Roseville Laurel was typically marked with foil labels. Some examples have hand-written shape numbers.  The factory stock page shows 13 Laurel shapes, including various vases and one rose bowl. 

 Roseville Pottery Laurel Vase

Lombardy is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1926.  Standard colors include semi-matte green and turquoise.  Most Lombardy pieces were unmarked, but some may have paper labels.  The factory stock pages show 18 shapes for the Lombardy pattern, including bowls, baskets, jardinières, vases, wall pockets, and flower frogs.

Roseville Pottery Lombardy Vase

Lotus was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1952.  Standard colors are brown, green, red, and blue.  Lotus is marked with the raised Lotus script mark, shape number, and size.  There are only 7 shapes listed on the factory stock page.  There is a vase, a pillow vase, a candlestick, a bowl, a window box, a wall pocket, and a planter.  Lotus has become popular with art deco collectors.

Roseville Pottery Lotus Vase

Luffa is a middle period Roseville pattern introduced in 1934.  The standard colors are green and brown.  The design features a floral and leaf effect at the top of each piece.  Luffa was marked with foil labels, and some examples may have hand-written shape numbers.  There are 25 shapes, including bowls, jardinières, pedestals vases, a sand jar, a candlestick, and a wall pocket.

Roseville Pottery Luffa Vase

Magnolia is a late period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1943.  Standard colors include blue, brown, and green.  Today’s collectors prefer the blue and green Magnolia over brown.  Some of the shapes have a Mid-Century Modern feel, with odd combinations of curves and angles.  Although 65 shapes were advertised, there are only 62 shapes in the factory stock pages.  Shapes include vases, baskets, bowls, jardinières, candlesticks, etc. Magnolia is marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark and shape number. 

Roseville Pottery Magnolia Vase

Rozane Mara is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1905.  The Mara pattern was decorated with exquisite rainbow tints that resemble the lining of seashells.  The 1907 catalog shows six Mara vases and one ewer. 

 The pattern was introduced as a response to Weller’s Sicard line.  It is very rare and valuable today.  Roseville Mara was typically marked with a Mara wafer, but some examples are unsigned.

Matt Green was introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1907.  Alternative collector names for this pattern include Mat Green and Matte Green.  It is sometimes difficult for Roseville collectors to distinguish Matt Green from Chloron and Egypto.  Standard color is matte green, sometimes mottled.  Matt Green was usually unmarked.  Some examples have been found with a die-impressed shape number.

Roseville Pottery Matte Green Vase

Roseville produced 302 shapes in the Matt Green glaze, including vases, dishes, bowls, planters, window boxes, hanging baskets, wall pockets, jardinières, umbrella stands, and more.  Many other American art pottery companies produced pottery similar to Roseville so it can sometimes be difficult to verify the maker unless the shape is shown in the factory stock pages.

Mayfair is a Mid Century Modern pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1949.  Standard colors include brown, green, and gray.  Mayfair was marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark, shape number, and size.  There are 39 Mayfair shapes, including baskets, vases, bowls, planters, window boxes, wall pockets, candlesticks, pitchers, etc.  Prices are increasing for the Roseville Mayfair pattern.

Roseville Pottery Mayfair Vase

Ming Tree is a Chinese Modern pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1949.  Standard colors include blue, green, and white.  Ming Tree was marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark, shape number, and size.  There are 22 Ming Tree shapes, including baskets, vases, bowls, planters, window boxes, wall pockets, candlesticks, ewers, etc.  Values are increasing for the Ming Tree pattern.

Roseville Pottery Ming Tree Vase

Mock Orange is a late period line introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1950.  Standard colors include green, pink and yellow.  Many of the shapes are Mid-Century Modern.  The factory stock pages show 42 different shapes, including baskets, vases, bowls, jardinières, planters, window boxes, candlesticks, cornucopias, ewers, etc.  Mock Orange is marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark and shape number.  Many pieces also have a Mock Orange mark.

Roseville Pottery Mock Orange Vase

Moderne is a popular Art Deco pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1936.  The standard colors are blue, turquoise, and pink.  Roseville Moderne was typically marked with die-impressed Roseville script marks, shape number, and sizes.  There are 30 shapes, including vases, flower frogs, bowls, candlesticks, and a candelabra. 

Roseville Pottery Moderne Vase

Montacello is an Arts and Crafts pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1931.  Standard colors are aqua and tan.  The tan pieces are more desirable than the aqua, but both are in high demand today.  Factory stock pages show 15 shapes, most of which are vases.  There are also baskets, bowls, and candlesticks.   

Roseville Pottery Montacello Vase

Montacello was marked with paper labels, and some examples have a hand-written shape number.  An alternate spelling for the pattern is Monticello. 

Morning Glory is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1935.  Its geometric design and angular handles give the pattern a look that strongly appeals to Art Deco collectors. Standard colors are green and white.  Green is usually priced higher than white. 

Roseville Pottery Morning Glory Vase

Early Morning Glory was originally marked with foil labels, some with hand written shape numbers.  Later examples have die-impressed Roseville script marks, shape number, and size.  There are 18 Morning Glory shapes, including vases, bowls, baskets, candlesticks, and a wall pocket. 

Moss is a middle period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1936.  Standard colors include pink, blue, and tan/peach.  The shapes are mid-century modern art deco style.  The pattern has 38 different shapes, including vases, jardinières, pedestals, flower frogs, flower pots, candlesticks, and wall pockets.  Moss is marked with the die-impressed Roseville script mark, shape number, and size. 

Roseville Pottery Moss Vase

Mostique is an early Arts and Crafts pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1916.  Standard colors are gray and tan.  There are 81 designs in the factory stock pages and an additional 13 on the July 1916 price list.  Mostique patterns include primarily vases, jardinières, and bowls.  Early Mostique pieces were unmarked, but later pieces were stamped with a black Rv logo. 

Roseville Pottery Mostique Vase

Normandy is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1928.  It has an Italianate design that features knots of vines, leaves, and berries on a brown textured background.  The body of each shape is fluted in green and ivory.  There 8 shapes, including jardinières and hanging baskets, listed in the factory stock pages. 

Roseville Pottery Normandy Vase

Roseville Normandy was a short-lived line, and its pieces were typically unmarked.  The pattern is somewhat similar to Roseville Corinthian and Roseville Donatello. 

Rozane Olympic was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1906.  It was decorated in the style of ancient Greek redware, so the standard colors are red, black, and ivory.  This line is highly valued by collectors.  Olympic is marked with hand-lettered Olympic marks.  There are no known factory stock pages or catalog listings for Olympic. 

Roseville Pottery Rozane Olympic Vase

Orian is a middle period Art Deco pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1935.  Standard colors are blue, red, yellow, or tan. There are active collectors for all colors in this pattern.  Orian was originally marked with foil labels.  Some examples have hand written shape numbers.  Factory stock pages shows 16 shapes, including several vases and a few bowls, candlesticks, and wall pockets. 

 Roseville Pottery Orian Vase

Pauleo is a popular Arts and Crafts pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1914.  The designers used numerous glazes with Pauleo, including lustres, matte mottled colors, and semi-gloss blends.  Most Pauleo pieces were without ornamentation, but some examples have hand painted decorations.  Both glazed and decorated examples are very rare today and prized by collectors.  Pauleo was either marked with a Pauleo wafer, marked with a Pauleo paper label, or unmarked altogether. 

Roseville Pottery Pauleo Vase

Peony is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1942.  Standard colors include green, yellow, and pink.  Peony was marked with a raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.  The factory stock pages show 62 shapes, including bowls, candle holders, jardinières, vases, ewers, cornucopias, baskets, wall pockets, etc.  Peony is starting to gain increasing interested among Roseville collectors.

Roseville Pottery Peony Vase

Pine Cone is a popular pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1935.  Many collectors spell the pattern pinecone.  Pine Cone was originally designed Frank Ferrell.  Standard colors are green, blue and brown.  There are 93 examples of Pine Cone in the factory stock pages.  The pattern includes vases, baskets, bookends, bowls, cornucopias, ashtrays, jardinières, wall pockets, candlesticks, etc.  In 1950 Pine Cone modern was introduced. All Pine Cone Modern pieces have shape numbers in the 400s.    

Roseville Pottery Pine Cone Vase

Early Pine Cone was marked with foil labels, and some had hand-written shape numbers.  Later pieces had die-impressed or raised Roseville script marks, shape numbers, and sizes.  Pine Cone has always been a favorite of collectors. 

Poppy is a middle period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1938.  Standard colors include green, gray and pink.  Many of Poppy’s shapes feature round, scroll-like handles.  It has elements of Classical design, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco, making it versatile enough for many decors. 

Roseville Pottery Poppy Vase

Although 40 shapes are advertised, the factory stock pages show 37.  Shapes include various planters, vases, wall pockets, and candlesticks. Poppy is marked with the die-impressed Roseville script mark and shape number. 

Primrose is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1936.  Standard colors are blue, pink, and tan.  Collectors tend to prefer the blue but there are collectors for both pink and tan examples.  Roseville Primrose was marked with die-impressed Roseville script marks, shape numbers, and sizes.  There are 37 Primrose examples, including vases, jardinières, pedestals, bowls, baskets, cornucopias, etc.

Roseville Pottery Primrose Vase

Raymor Modern Artware is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1953.  Standard colors are white, gold, and black.  This little-known line of Mid-Century Modern artware was created by freelance designer Ben Seibel after the success of his Raymor Modern stoneware. 

Roseville Pottery Raymor Vase

Raymor Modern Artware was marked with raised ‚Äúraymor modern artware by Roseville‚ÄĚ script marks, sizes, and shape numbers.¬† Shapes include vases, bowls, desk accessories, and other decorative pieces.¬† There are no known factory stock pages for this line.

Raymore Modern Stoneware is a Mid-Century Modern line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1952.  The line was designed by freelance designer Ben Seibel, and it remains one of the most popular patterns with Mid-Century Modern collectors.  The odd-shaped serving pieces are the most prized.  Standard colors are dark brown, avocado, white, gray, and pumpkin. 

There are 55 Raymore Modern Stoneware items in the factory brochure, including a variety of serving dishes.¬† Raymore Modern Stoneware is marked with the raised ‚Äúraymore by Roseville‚ÄĚ script mark and shape number.¬†

Raymore Two-Tone Casual was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1953.  Because it was one of the last lines to be produced before the factory was sold, this little-known line is rare today.  Raymore Two-Tone Casual used conservative shapes and semi-gloss or matte glazes.  Lids are usually white, and the colored samples have white spatter along the top. 

Raymore Two-Tone Casual was marked with raised marks, including ‚Äúraymore Gourmet service for the Gourmet by Roseville,‚ÄĚ or a simpler version on smaller pieces.¬† Other pieces have an ‚ÄúR,‚ÄĚ a ‚ÄúU.S.A.‚ÄĚ and the shape number.¬† The factory stock pages show 13 shapes, including pitchers, bowls, and baking dishes.

Rosecraft is an early Classical pattern that was introduced by 1921.  Standard colors are green, blue and pink.  Other factory names for this pattern include Azurine, Rosecraft Black, Rosecraft Colors, Florane, Orchid, and Turquoise.  Early Rosecraft was unmarked, but later pieces had a blue Rv inkstamp, a paper label, or a foil label.  There are 102 shapes, including compotes, vases, flower blocks, bowls, vases, baskets, candlesticks, wall pockets, etc.

Roseville Pottery Rosecraft Vase

Rosecraft Hexagon is an arts and crafts pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1925.  Standard colors are green, blue and brown.  All three colors of Rosecraft Hexagon are highly sought-after by Roseville collectors.  The blue pieces are very hard to find.  Most Hexagon examples are stamped with a blue Rv logo, but some are unmarked or have a mark obscured by glaze.  There are 15 shapes in the factory stock pages, including bowls, vases, and a wall pocket. 

Roseville Pottery Rosecraft Hexagon Vase

Rosecraft Panel is a middle period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1926.  Standard colors are brown and green.  Panel features realistic florals or nude figures, and it often has Art Nouveau elements.  The pattern is also sought-after by Arts and Crafts collectors. The pattern includes only 10 different shapes, and most of them are vases.  There are several other known Panel shapes not shown in the factory catalog pages.  Panel is typically stamped with blue Rv logo, but there are unmarked examples. 

Roseville Pottery Rosecraft Panel Vase

Rosecraft Vintage is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1925.  The standard background color is brown, but there are some examples with dark green.  The pattern features a grape pattern with Art Nouveau elements.  Rosecraft Vintage also strongly appeals to arts and crafts collectors.  There are 24 different shapes for the Roseville Vintage pattern, including primarily vases, bowls, and jardinières.  Vintage was either unmarked or stamped with the blue Rv logo. 

Roseville Pottery Rosecraft Vintage Vase

Royal Capri is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1954.  Royal Capri’s Mid-Century Modern shapes are decorated with a mirror or molten textured gilt.  There are 21 shapes in the factory stock pages, including bowls, vases, baskets, planters, ashtrays, etc.  Pieces were originally marked with raised Roseville script marks, shape numbers, and sizes.

Roseville Pottery Royal Capri Vase

The Rozane Line is a middle period line that was introduced by 1920. Most Roseville collectors refer to the pattern as Rozane 1917. Standard colors include blue, green, pink, white, and yellow.  The line features a realistically colored floral bouquet modeled in relief against a dimpled background. 

The Rozane Line factory stock pages show only 16 different shapes, including vases, fern dishes, compotes, baskets, window boxes, jardini√®res, and umbrella stands. Rozane Line was marked with a distinctive black inkstamp that has the words ‚ÄúRoseville Pottery‚ÄĚ arranged in a semi-circle around the word ‚ÄúRozane.‚Ä̬† Some examples are unmarked.¬†

Rozane Pattern is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1941.  Standard colors include blue, brown, and green.  Unlike Rozane 1917, Rozane Pattern pieces were undecorated, with matte mottled glazes blending from a dark base to near ivory at the rim.  The 26 Rozane Pattern shapes include primarily vases and bowls.  Rozane Pattern was marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.

Roseville Pottery Rozane Pattern Vase

Rozane Mongol is an early period Arts and Crafts pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1905.  The standard color is red, sometimes with mottling in black or pink. Mongol examples are highly sought after by Arts and Crafts collectors.  Most Mongol pieces have a Mongol wafer, but some are unmarked.  The 1905 catalog shows 9 different Mongol vases and a 3-handled drinking cup.

Rozane Royal is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1901.  The pattern was introduced as a less expensive alternative to Rookwood’s popular Standard Glaze line.  Roseville Royal was either undecorated or slip decorated.  Pieces with finely painted decoration, artist signatures, landscapes, or portraits are preferred by collectors.   There were 246 different shapes in the Rozane Royal line. 

Roseville Pottery Rozane Royal Vase

Early pieces were typically marked with the die-impressed ‚ÄúRozane‚ÄĚ mark, the shape number, and ‚ÄúR.P.Co,‚ÄĚ but some were unmarked.¬† Later pieces had the Rozane Ware wafer.¬†

Russco is a popular Art Deco pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1934.  Standard colors include blue, gold, green, and salmon. The blue and salmon examples have matte glazes.  Both the green and yellow glazes have a crystalline quality, and some green examples have crystals large enough to resemble snowflakes.  These highly crystalline examples bring higher prices than the matte glaze examples. 

Roseville Pottery Russco Vase

Russco was marked with foil labels, and some examples have hand-written shape numbers.  The factory stock pages show 24 shapes for the Russco pattern, including vases, bowls, candlesticks, cornucopias, and flower blocks.

Savona was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1929.  Standard colors are green, blue, salmon, and yellow.  Savona was marked with paper labels.  Factory stock pages show 25 examples of Savona, including compotes, bowls, flower blocks, and vases.  Today this line is fairly rare, and prices are rising.

Roseville Pottery Savona Vase

Silhouette is a Mid-Century Modern pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1950.  Standard colors include turquoise, red, tan, and white.  The line features unusual shapes with low-relief florals, leaves, or female nudes.  There are 36 Silhouette shapes, including baskets, bowls, vases, planters, candlesticks, etc.  Silhouette was marked with raised Roseville script marks, shape numbers, and sizes. 

Roseville Pottery Silhouette Vase

Snowberry is a late period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1947.  Standard colors include pink, green, and blue.  All three colors are sought-after by Roseville collectors.  Some of the shapes are Mid-Century Modern, which makes them appealing to collectors.  The pattern includes 52 different shapes, including vases, bowls, baskets, jardinières, pedestals, etc. Snowberry is marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size. 

Roseville Pottery Snowberry Vase

Sunflower is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1930.  The pattern’s popularity and value rose sharply in the 1990s when it was featured in a major home decorating magazine.  Prices are still high today. 

Roseville Pottery Sunflower Vase

Roseville Sunflower was originally marked with paper labels, and some samples had hand-written shape numbers. There are 15 examples of Sunflower in the factory stock pages, including various vases, jardinières, a bowl, an umbrella stand, and a wall pocket.

Sylvan is an early pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1920.  The pattern features rustic shapes decorated with low-relief carvings of various animals against a bisque background colored in shades of tan and green.  Sylvan examples are highly sought after by collectors.  The factory stock pages show 25 shapes for the Sylvan pattern, including bowls, flower pots, fern dishes, baskets, window boxes, and jardinières.  Sylvan was typically unmarked. 

Teasel is an Art Deco pattern that was introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1938.  Standard colors are green, blue and peach.  Teasel is marked with the die-impressed Roseville script mark and shape number.  There are 18 Teasel designs, including vases, bowls, baskets, a jardinière, and a candlestick.  This line is moderately priced and considered to be a good investment for beginning collectors.   

Roseville Pottery Teasel Vase

Thornapple is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1937.  Standard colors included blue, brown, and pink.  Its Art Deco touches make it popular with collectors.  Thornapple was originally marked with die-impressed Roseville script marks, shape numbers, and sizes.  There are 54 Thornapple examples in the factory stock pages, including bowls, baskets, jardinières, pedestals, centerpieces, etc. 

Roseville Pottery Thornapple Vase

Topeo is a middle period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1934.  Standard colors include blue and cherry red.  The red pieces are Art Deco, and the blue samples are Arts and Crafts style.  The factory stock pages include only 15 different shapes, including various vases, bowls, and candlesticks. Topeo was marked with foil labels, and some have hand-written shape numbers. 

Roseville Pottery Topeo Vase

Tourmaline is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery around 1933.  Standard colors include blue, green, pink, aqua, and yellow.  The pattern style appeals to both Arts and Crafts and Art Deco collectors.  The 20 shapes for the Roseville Tourmaline pattern include primarily vases and bowls.  Tourmaline was usually marked with foil labels, and some have hand-written shape numbers. 

Roseville Pottery Tourmaline VaseTuscany is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1928.  Standard colors are gray, green, and pink.  Arts and Crafts collectors are drawn to the matte gray glaze, but Art Deco lovers prefer the semi-gloss mottled pink.  Roseville Tuscany was typically marked with paper labels.  Factory stock pages show 25 examples of Tuscany, including vases, bowls, wall pockets, and candlesticks.  Tuscany is an affordable middle period Roseville line likely to increase in value. 

Roseville Pottery Tuscany Vase

Velmoss is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1935.  An alternate name for this popular Roseville pattern is Velmoss II.  The blue, green, and tan pieces are Arts and Crafts style, while the rose examples are more Art Deco.  Velmoss was originally marked with foil labels.  Some examples have hand written shape numbers.  Later examples have die-impressed Roseville script marks.  The 19 Velmoss shapes include several different vases and bowls.

Roseville Velmoss

Velmoss Scroll is a pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery between 1917 and 1922.  Collectors sometimes refer to the pattern as Velmoss I or Velmoss Schroll.  Bassett refers to the line as Roseville Early Rosecraft.  The pattern style is Arts and Crafts, with the Scottish rose on a thorny vine impressed into a creamware body.  The 33 shapes for Velmoss Scroll include bowls, vases, pitchers, jardinières, pedestals, candlesticks, and wall pockets.  Velmoss Scroll was usually unmarked. 

Roseville Pottery Velmoss Scroll Vase

Victorian Art is a middle period line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1925.  Standard colors include brown, chartreuse, or gray.  Victorian Art is often sought-after by collectors of early Roseville.  The pattern includes only 12 different examples.  Shapes include various bowls and vases. Victorian Art is either unmarked or stamped with the blue Rv logo. 

Roseville Pottery Victorian Art Vase

Vista is a popular middle period pattern that was most likely introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1920.  Some Vista collectors refer to the pattern as Roseville Forest.  This Arts and Crafts line features pottery with scenes of palm trees decorated in semi-gloss pastels.  There are no published Roseville references to Vista.  Roseville is typically unmarked but some examples have a blue inkstamp mark giving the shape number and size. 

Roseville Pottery Vista Vase

Volpato is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1922.  The pattern features smooth and fluted sections accented with rose garlands, all in a glossy buff color. Early Volpato was unmarked, and later examples had either die-impressed Rv logo marks or paper labels.  The factory stock pages show 33 shapes for the Volpato pattern, including bowls, jardinières, vases, baskets, candlesticks, etc.

Roseville Pottery Volpato Vase

Water Lily is a late line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1943.  Standard colors are brown, blue, and pink.  Roseville pottery advertisements indicated the pattern included 50 shapes but only 48 appear in the factory stock pages.  The pattern includes vases, bowls, baskets, bookends, cornucopias, ewers, jardinières, etc.  Water Lilly is marked with the raised Roseville USA script mark and shape number.

Roseville Pottery Water Lily Vase

White Rose was a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1940.  Standard colors include blue, pink, and brown.  White Rose was marked with raised Roseville script marks, shape number, and size.  There are 56 White Rose shapes in the factory stock pages, including vases, bowls, cornucopias, jardinières, etc. 

Roseville Pottery White Rose VaseWincraft is a Mid-Century Modern pattern that was introduced by Roseville pottery in 1948.  The tan and blue examples are usually more popular than the green pieces, but prices for the entire line are rising.  Wincraft was marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.  There are 51 Wincraft shapes, including vases, baskets, cornucopias, wall pockets, etc.

Roseville Pottery Wincraft Vase

Windsor is a middle period Art Deco line introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1931.  Standard colors are blue and rust.  Windsor is popular with the same collectors who buy Ferella and Falline.  The pattern includes only 15 different examples.  Shapes include various vases and baskets, as well as one bowl and candlestick. Windsor was originally marked with paper labels, and some pieces have hand-written shape numbers. 

Roseville Pottery Windsor Vase

Wisteria is a middle period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1933.  Standard colors are blue and brown, with blue being the most popular among collectors.  The pattern, which was probably spelled Wistaria, features wisteria blossoms in relief on blue or brown backgrounds.  The 16 shapes for the Roseville Wisteria pattern include primarily vases and bowls.  Wisteria was originally marked with foil labels, and some pieces have hand-written shape numbers.

Roseville Pottery Wisteria Vase

Woodland is an early period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1905.  Other factory names for this pattern include Rozane Woodland.  The Japanese-inspired Woodland pattern was decorated with various enamel colors set against a bisque background.  The 1905 catalog shows 16 different Woodland vases.  Most examples have the Woodland wafer, but some are unmarked. 

Roseville Pottery Woodland Vase

Zephyr Lily is a late period pattern introduced by Roseville Pottery in 1946.  Standard colors include blue, green, and brown.  The factory stock pages show 51 shapes, including vases, ewers, compotes, cornucopias, etc.  Zephyr Lily was marked with the raised Roseville script mark, shape number, and size.  Prices for this late period Roseville pattern are increasing. 

Roseville Pottery Zephyr Lily